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Archive for the ‘Public Schools of New Orleans’ Category

RSD school fails 6-year-old and the community

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By Angela W. Daliet

I just finished an on camera interview with Sheldon Fox of ABC26 News regarding a disturbing story of a 6-year-old being handcuffed to his desk by a security guard at Sarah T. Reed Elementary, a Recovery School District school, earlier this week. Though you can catch some of my comments on the story on ABC26 News at 10pm tonight, there is too much to be said for them to cover it all. This story is too important to be relegated to a 15 or 30 second spot on the evening news.

The parents of the first grade student weren’t even told about the incident and discovered it only after the child complained of sore wrists! Where is the accountability by the school, teacher and security guard to the community and parents? You won’t find that type of accountability in standardized test scores, for sure.

Here are some other very important points to make note of:

  • Our city’s public school children are the most at-risk within our community and the RSD serves the most severe of these students (though I use the word “serves” loosely). No one “chooses” an RSD school, these are the schools of last resort.
  • They have the largest number of children with special needs, as well as students that won’t or can’t conform to the mostly rigid, strict curriculum and environmental policies of charter schools.
  • These schools are ill-equipped. They have under qualified, inexperienced teachers trying to bring these students up to grade level while also dealing with constant, sometimes severe, behavior issues.
  • These schools and their teachers are under resourced and underpaid.

Now when we talk about the issues, we are labeled as anti-RSD or anti-charter, but the fact remains that the state took over most local schools to rid itself of these issues and educate our children. However, one system simply replaced another without clear plans, interventions and resources to fix the systemic problems that existed before. We now have a public school “system” where the handful of schools that are performing adequately either “choose” their students through selective admissions processes, or the improvements are based on unrealistic and unsustainable reform measures such as teachers and principals working long hours on little pay with no family attachments.

Then there are the rest of the kids, students like this one that was handcuffed to a desk for a school day last week. I leave you with one last thought and two questions.  Until we admit the issues, flaws and inequities that exist in this “system” and fix them by putting a good school in every neighborhood that serves that community’s kids, we will continue to fail more generations of New Orleanians. My questions are these: Why don’t we value teachers in this country by hiring the best, giving them adequate training and resources, supporting them and paying them what they deserve? And why are we not holding the state accountable for not educating and serving our children?

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Yes, Secretary Duncan, it WAS a dumb thing to say

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As a public school advocate and parent of 3 kids in New Orleans’ public schools, the secretary’s remarks that Katrina was the “best thing to happen to public education in New Orleans” is incredibly offensive and quite frankly off the mark. And to say that it took Katrina to wake up the community is even more absurd.

New Orleanians have long understood and maintained that our poor public schools are our city’s primary ailment. It did not take the loss of our family members, possessions, homes, neighborhoods and schools to make us realize this.

We are the ones that have not been educated by these schools and who have advocated for years to have a system that provides a quality education to every student in the city, no matter their address or race. If our community of public school parents had some power and access to local, state and national leaders, we would have explained to you and your peers long before August 29, 2005 that our needs weren’t being served and that we must do better together.

The assumption now is that we, the community, are being heard, but I have to challenge that new leadership is just listening to their new friends (who aren’t necessarily New Orleanians and definitely not utilizing the public education system).

So, here’s my question to Mr. Duncan: If, as a national leader in education, you believe wholeheartedly that what is happening in New Orleans is working and will bring a full success story for New Orleans, how do we, the community, bend your ear to the problems and issues being exacerbated and swept under the rug that were ignored by leadership for years before Hurricane Katrina?

Please don’t tell me we have to lose everything again to get you to listen.

Read a transcript of Secretary Duncan’s comments here.

Get Schooled on Schools Part II

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Did you take SOSNOLA’s Citizen Year-End Exam in our last blog entry? Well, how did you do?

In case you needed a little help remembering which schools fall under which governing entities, here’s an organizational chart we created that outlines public schools and agencies: