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Public Education News, Analysis and Views

Archive for May 2010

RSD school fails 6-year-old and the community

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By Angela W. Daliet

I just finished an on camera interview with Sheldon Fox of ABC26 News regarding a disturbing story of a 6-year-old being handcuffed to his desk by a security guard at Sarah T. Reed Elementary, a Recovery School District school, earlier this week. Though you can catch some of my comments on the story on ABC26 News at 10pm tonight, there is too much to be said for them to cover it all. This story is too important to be relegated to a 15 or 30 second spot on the evening news.

The parents of the first grade student weren’t even told about the incident and discovered it only after the child complained of sore wrists! Where is the accountability by the school, teacher and security guard to the community and parents? You won’t find that type of accountability in standardized test scores, for sure.

Here are some other very important points to make note of:

  • Our city’s public school children are the most at-risk within our community and the RSD serves the most severe of these students (though I use the word “serves” loosely). No one “chooses” an RSD school, these are the schools of last resort.
  • They have the largest number of children with special needs, as well as students that won’t or can’t conform to the mostly rigid, strict curriculum and environmental policies of charter schools.
  • These schools are ill-equipped. They have under qualified, inexperienced teachers trying to bring these students up to grade level while also dealing with constant, sometimes severe, behavior issues.
  • These schools and their teachers are under resourced and underpaid.

Now when we talk about the issues, we are labeled as anti-RSD or anti-charter, but the fact remains that the state took over most local schools to rid itself of these issues and educate our children. However, one system simply replaced another without clear plans, interventions and resources to fix the systemic problems that existed before. We now have a public school “system” where the handful of schools that are performing adequately either “choose” their students through selective admissions processes, or the improvements are based on unrealistic and unsustainable reform measures such as teachers and principals working long hours on little pay with no family attachments.

Then there are the rest of the kids, students like this one that was handcuffed to a desk for a school day last week. I leave you with one last thought and two questions.  Until we admit the issues, flaws and inequities that exist in this “system” and fix them by putting a good school in every neighborhood that serves that community’s kids, we will continue to fail more generations of New Orleanians. My questions are these: Why don’t we value teachers in this country by hiring the best, giving them adequate training and resources, supporting them and paying them what they deserve? And why are we not holding the state accountable for not educating and serving our children?